Sweet violin playing and delicious cakes put a positive spin on the WCMG planting day.

On Saturday the 4 th of May 2019, the Whangawehi Catchment Management Group hosted a community planting day out on Taharoa Trust-a family farm owned by Pat and Sue O’Brien.

The day went extremely well with an overwhelming attendance of more than 50 participants ranging from the very young to the more mature folk! Gumboots were essential on the day due to the bulk of the planting been based around the periphery of a wetland. The highlight of the day was listening to the sweet violin playing by local violinist John De La Haye who set the tone with some invigorating Irish classics.  The variety of delicious cakes offered by local ladies at lunch time also helped keep the momentum going.

A big thank you to all the participants-especially those who came as far as Havelock North and Gisborne to give us a hand. The group would also like to thank all our funders with a special pat on the back to the Wai Maori Trust who have funded a large part of this work alongside Nga Whenua Rahui.

Thanks to you all for supporting our community initiative. We look forward to seeing you again in the future.

 

Million Meter fundraiser

The WCMG is working with the Sustainable Business Network to fundraise money for our restoration project on Taharoa Trust. Our fundraising goal is $60,000 dollars that will go towards trees, tree establishment and tree maintenance (3 years after establishment).

If you want to make a difference and be part of the solution for cleaner waters and more sustainable landscapes please donate : https://millionmetres.org.nz/open-project/te-mangatupae-stream-whangawehi

44% of New Zealand’s monitored lakes are so polluted virtually nothing can survive in them. 

62% of New Zealand’s lowland rivers are so polluted with pathogens we can’t safely swim in them.

74% of New Zealand’s freshwater fish species are now classified as ‘threatened’.

YOU CAN MAKE A DIFFERENCE, COME AND JOIN US

Regenerative Hill Country research project

On Tuesday the 23d and Wednesday the 24th of April 2019, Will McMillan and Henrik Moller came to visit the Whangawehi project and meet with members of our community. Beef and Lamb is leading a Research project on regenerative hill country landscapes and will work with our Whangawehi farming community in the near future.

A big thank you to all our landowners for making the time to meet with them.


Award celebration

On Friday the 16th of March, the WCMG gathered at the Mokotaki hall to celebrate winning it’s International Asia/Pacific River prize award. We were privileged to have the company of our founding leader, Kathleen Mato who surprised everyone by turning up from Gisborne. She is very proud of what we have achieved to date. The evening went very well and gave everyone the opportunity to take the time to enjoy each others company, reflect on the work done and celebrate what we have achieved.

A day out with the aunties at Mangaharuru

On Saturday 16th of February, I had the pleasure of driving Sophie Dodd, Rae Te Nahu and Toria Te Nahu to a blessing ceremony organised by Mangaharuru Tangitu Trust. The day went extremely well with the unveiling of a Pou Whenua and the blessing of a funeral site for birds. The WCMG attended a similar event in 2015. It was good to see the project progressing well with birds returning to the colony. Maybe one day, a similar project could take place in the catchment.

Michael Fay signals the go ahead for the Whangawehi walkway

On Thursday 13th February 2019, Sir Michael Fay, owner of Pongaroa Station agreed to work with the New Zealand Access Commission to create (along with other landowners) the first official walkway in the catchment. Michael Fay joins Pat & Sue O’Brien who signed on in 2017. Well done to you all. This is a significant milestone in our development and we will keep you up to date with developments as they happen.

The Mangatupae project is starting

Pat O’Brien and Farm Manager Josh Rofe were happy to see Trevor Telfort (our local earth moving contractor) back on Taharoa Trust to blade the fence line for the Mangatupae restoration project. The Mangatupae stream is a  highly erodible short and steep catchment. The lower reaches have been already retired with 2 bush blocks but the upper catchment was a challenging beast.  

In order to retire the stream, Pat had to retire a substantial amount of land. The stream retirement includes the retirement of an existing bush block of 5 ha. The steep land that will remain grazed by stock is currently being planted with native trees used as soil conservation trees.

The work done will be used to showcase best practise in a steep hill country environment.