5 days to go before the end of our fundraising campaign.

Hi all,

The Whangawehi Catchment Management Group started a fundraising campaign in June 2015 to fund the establishment of native trees along the Whangawehi river. In 5 days, the fundraising campaign will be finished. We have already achieved a lot but we need your support to reach our target. You can support us by promoting the campaign to your friends and neighbours or by donating on : http://millionmetres.org.nz/donate/.

Thank you for your help in improving water quality and biodiversity in our region.

Na mihi nui

Nic

Room 1 students share their reef workshop learnings

The journey of the Crayfish

The journey of Crayfish

The journey of crayfish started in the sea but our day started down at Whangawehi as we waited patiently for the boat Aurora to come and dock down in the Jetty. Skippered by Selwyn and his crewman Tom they pulled into the jetty with baskets full of crayfish. The tamariki got a close up look of the crayfish in their baskets.

Both our journey and the crayfish’s journey carried on to Mahia Beach as we trailed behind Selwyn’s truck that carried the sea creatures. We got to view the holding pools where the crayfish were transferred into from the truck. Yvette weighed the catches in their baskets before they were put into the pools. The water in the holding pools had to be around 11 degrees to keep the crayfish from getting distressed. No more than 12kg of crayfish were put in each basket allowing room for the crayfish to move around. The holding pools that we viewed could fit up to two tonne of crayfish but the truck that transports them out of Mahia can’t hold as much crayfish therefore the number of trips per week varies.

When the crayfish are delivered to the depot in Masterton or Wellington they are graded A, B, C or D based on their size. Crayfish are then exported to other countries and are put into special chilly bins to hibernate. The temperature inside the chilly bin is lowered in order for the crayfish to hibernate and sleep. When the crayfish arrive at their destination the temperature in the chilly bin is increased resulting in the crayfish waking. Majority of the crayfish that leave our shores are exported to Asian countries, one in particular is China.

We all had an amazing day learning about crayfish. The tamariki also held a crayfish and loved posing holding them. We learnt interesting facts about crayfish and crayfishing too. A female crayfish has fins on the inside of its tail and that is where the eggs are kept. Around the beginning of October is when female crayfish start dropping their eggs. Two of the most important facts the children were told is you cannot take crayfish with eggs, and the legal size in which you can take a crayfish, is it has to measure at least 60mm across the tail.

Thank you Selwyn, Tom and Yvette for sharing your experiences and knowledge of crayfish, crayfishing, storing and exporting crayfish, and also to the crayfish where none were harmed in our journey!

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Te Mahia school student enjoyed their reef workshop

A message from Nicky O’Brien, School Principal at Te Mahia and studenets

 Kiaora korua,

The children, staff, bus driver, parents – everyone, was absolutely buzzing about the session yesterday. Sandy Telford who drives the bus said she was in bed at 10pm last night trying to go to sleep and still going over all of what she had leant during the session. A very big successful day thank you Jenni. Once again working your magic.

http://www.temahiaroom2.blogspot.co.nz/2015/10/enviro-schools-beach-day.html

Today we had an amazing enviroschools trip.

It began with a trip down to Whangawehi where we met the Aurora, and their crayfish catch for the day. Rob and Selwyn where there to show us what they had caught for the day, and showed us how they loaded them onto the back of the truck.

From there they drove them around to Nanny Doi’s house where they have special crayfish pools. These pools are where the crayfish stay before being trucked down to Wellington, and from there they fly out to China.

Once we had had a look at the crayfish in the pools, and asked Rob and Selwyn questions about the crayfish, we wandered around to the fishing club for lunch.

After lunch we had three different activities to head off and do. With Whaea Jenni we pretended to catch some “laminated” fish. We had to identify what fish we had caught and find our whether or not it was a legal size.
With Aunty Ali we learnt about how to get Paua correctly, and without harming them. We even had turns at shucking the paua. Aunty Ali had even cooked up some Paua for us all to sample! It was delicious.
Nanny Rae was very kindly monitoring us all on the rocks and making sure we didn’t disappear around the point. We had a lot of fun finding limpets, and crabs, as well as avoiding the incoming tide!

It was so nice for us all to get out in this beautiful spring weather and make the most of all that is around us here in beautiful Mahia! We are all very lucky that all the information we learnt, we can now put into practice when we all go to collect our own kai moana.

Rae Te Nahu nominated to the New Zealander of the year.

Hi all,

Rae Te Nahu has been nominated for the New Zealander of the Year Award  for her dedication and commitment to the Mahia Community. Here’s the link to the Facebook post:

https://www.facebook.com/newzealanderoftheyear/photos/a.150994401650901.38053.147902845293390/884051478345186/?type=3&theatre

Feel free to share this post on your Facebook page and spread the word!

Tena koe

 

Whangawehi fundraising campaign : one month to go.

Hi all,

The Whangawehi Catchment Management Group started a fundraising campaign in June 2015 to fund the establishment of native trees along the Whangawehi river. We have already fundraised 63 % of our target with donations coming from all around the country.
We need your help before the end of October when our fundraising campaign ends. You can support us by promoting the campaign to your friends and neighbours or by donating on : http://millionmetres.org.nz/donate/.
Thank you for your help in improving water quality and biodiversity in our region.

Na mihi nui

Nic

La Communaute de Whangawehi (https://whangawehi.com/), petite bourgade de pecheurs eleveurs a forte composante Maori, a entrepris, il y a 2 ans la restoration de leur bassin versant situe sur la cote est de l’ile du Nord en Nouvelle Zelande. Le groupe a deja etablis plusieurs milliers d’arbres natifs de Nouvelle Zelande dans les zones de ripisylves mais le travail est immense. La campagne de recherche de financements debutee en Juin va se terminer a la fin du mois d’Octobre. Vous pouvez supporter notre cause en partageant notre ambitieux projet avec vos amis ou en effectuant une donation   http://millionmetres.org.nz/donate/
Grand merci pour votre aide.

Nicolas Caviale Delzescaux

Porteur de projet